The Cape Cod Chorale has announced a joint performance with Choral Art Society of the South Shore of “Tis the Season of Song” on Sunday, December 13, at 4 PM. The concert will be the chorale’s first virtual event and will celebrate the beauty of the holiday season.

The program will consist of four pieces: a rousing arrangement of “Jingle Bells” by David Willcocks and John Rutter; the traditional Chanukah song “Maoz Tsur” (“Rock of Ages”), arranged by Ross Fishman; “Et in Terra Pax” from “Gloria” by Antonio Vivaldi; and the classic “In The Bleak Mid-Winter” by Christina Rossetti and Harold Darke.

In addition to the virtual concert, the performance will also include some participatory “Name that Holiday Tune” fun.

As have many choruses and musical ensembles, during 2020 the Cape Cod Chorale has found innovative ways to come together to create music. Since September, both choruses have held bi-weekly rehearsals and vocalists have practiced on their own using guide tracks produced by Danica A. Buckley. She is the artistic director for both groups.

For performances individual vocalists have recorded themselves singing their part for each piece, and behind the scenes the videos were stitched together to form a “virtual choir” accompanied by Ellyses Kuan of the Choral Art Society and Cathy Bonnett of the Cape Cod Chorale.

The virtual program on December 13 is free and donations are welcome.

To view the performance, email info@capecodchorale.org prior to 8 PM on Saturday, December 12, and instructions and a link to the concert will be provided.

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