Museums on the Green in Falmouth will host 12 talks in May as part of its ongoing Virtual Museum Series.

During the month, authors and historians from across the country will be talking about Thomas Jefferson’s daughters, American poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Dr. Seuss, and Chief Justice John Marshall. Additional topics will include notorious art plunderers, unlikely African explorers, a little-known spy and a famous hotel.

In addition, due in part to a grant from Mass Humanities, two talks will be free for all.

The first free talk on Tuesday, May 11, at 7 PM will feature author Lew Paper speaking about his book “In the Cauldron.” In the second half of 1941, America’s economic sanctions were crippling Japan. President Franklin D. Roosevelt thought it was just a matter of time before its leaders yielded to American demands. Joseph Grew, America’s ambassador to Japan, knew time had nothing to do with it. In his talk, Mr. Paper will take participants “In the Cauldron” to learn about the ambassador’s struggle to orchestrate an agreement and avoid Pearl Harbor amid the terror and tension of war.

An ominous legend is behind the second free talk, author Christopher Skaife’s new book, “The Ravenmaster.” It is said that if the Tower of London’s ravens should ever leave, the Crown will fall and Britain with it. On Thursday, May 27, at 7 PM, participants will have a rare opportunity to visit with the Ravenmaster, the caretaker of these infamous birds. According to Yeoman Warder Christopher Skaife, ravens hold grudges, play tricks, grieve loss, bond tightly and have definite individual likes and dislikes. The Tower’s ravens have also had some harrowing and humorous adventures on his watch.

For the rest of the May lineup, admission to each talk is $10, $5 for museum members. Registration is through the museum’s website. Registrants will receive a link to access the talks online through Zoom.

Those interested can also purchase companion books from the Museums’ co-host, Eight Cousins Bookstore in Falmouth. Order online or call 508-548-5548.

The full lineup for Museums on the Green’s May Virtual Museum Series includes:

Monday, May 3: “Hitler’s First 100 Days: When Germans Embraced the Third Reich,” with author Peter Fritzsche.

Tuesday, May 4: “Jefferson’s Daughters: Three Sisters, White and Black, in a Young America,” with author Catherine Kerrison.

Thursday, May 6: “Agent Jack: The True Story of MI5’s Secret Nazi Hunter,” with author Robert Hutton.

Monday, May 10: “War Fever: Boston, Baseball, and America in the Shadow of the Great War,” with author Randy Roberts.

Tuesday, May 11: “In the Cauldron: Terror, Tension, and the American Ambassador’s Struggle to Avoid Pearl Harbor,” with author Lew Paper.

Wednesday, May 12: “Cross of Snow: A Life of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow,” with author Nicholas Basbanes.

Thursday, May 13: “The Barbizon: The Hotel that Set Women Free,” with author Paulina Bren.

Monday, May 17: “Goring’s Man in Paris: The Story of a Nazi Plunderer and his World,” with author Jonathan Petropoulos.

Thursday, May 20: “Olive the Lionheart: Lost Love, Imperial Spies, and One Women’s Journey into the Heart of Africa,” with author Brad Ricca.

Tuesday, May 25: “Without Precedent: Chief Justice John Marshall and His Times,” with author Joel Richard Paul.

Wednesday, May 26: “Becoming Dr. Seuss: Theodor Geisel and the Making of an American Imagination,” with author Brian Jay Jones.

Thursday, May 27: “The Ravenmaster: My Life with the Ravens at the Tower of London,” with Christopher Skaife.

All talks are scheduled for 7 PM.

Recommended for you

(0) comments

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it Clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
PLEASE TURN OFF YOUR CAPS LOCK.
Don't Threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be Truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be Nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
Be Proactive. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.
Share with Us. We'd love to hear eyewitness accounts, the history behind an article.