The Cape and Islands United Way announced the nonprofit organizations they will partner with for the coming year at a celebration Tuesday night at the Cape Cod Museum of Art.

Among 36 area organizations chosen to receive funding as Community Impact Partners, several are from Falmouth: Falmouth Service Center, Gosnold on Cape Cod, Cape Cod Center for Women, Mothers and Infants Recovery Network, The Samaritans, and St. Vincent de Paul. Other nonprofits funded whose programs impact Falmouth include Boys & Girls Club of Cape Cod, Big Brothers Big Sisters of Cape Cod & Islands, American Red Cross, Calmer Choice, Children’s Cove, HopeHealth Dementia & Alzheimer’s Services, and WE CAN.

The Cape and Islands United Way focuses on health, education, financial stability and housing. Projects are chosen to help further the local United Way’s vision to foster communities on Cape Cod, Martha’s Vineyard and Nantucket win which children succeed, families are financially stable, residents are healthy, and there is safe and affordable housing for all.

“This year reflects the first year of a real change in our philosophy,” reported Barbara J. Milligan, president and CEO of the United Way and a resident of Falmouth. “We’re on a journey to develop lasting solutions to our community challenges. This can only be done by understanding how the needs in our community are related—for example, how substance abuse impacts and is intertwined with family financial stability, early childhood outcomes, domestic violence and homelessness. How do we connect these dots to lead lasting change—and where does money need to be invested? We’re working harder to understand the big picture, find those answers, and make funding decisions accordingly.”

Falmouth organizations chosen to partner with the United Way in the coming year include two programs at the Falmouth Service Center: Foods to Encourage, a food pantry program focused on healthy eating and controlling chronic medical conditions; and Financial Assistance Stabilization Fund, which allows the center to help families and individuals bridge short-term needs.

Gosnold on Cape Cod received support for its Behavioral Health Integration with Pediatric Care program, which helps young people who are experiencing psychic stress, substance abuse, or emotional challenges manage these issues in a constructive, healthy manner.

Cape Cod Center for Women received funds to help purchase a new shelter in Falmouth, while the Mothers and Infants Recovery Network’s Mothers Helping Mothers Support Group received support for their work to provide emotional support to mothers in recovery and connect them to services.

Additional support was received by the Samaritans on Cape Cod and the Islands, headquartered in Falmouth, for their Second Chance Support Group for Suicide Survivors and by St. Anthony’s Conference of the Society of St. Vincent de Paul in East Falmouth for the Falmouth Housing Assistance Fund.

More than $110,000 was distributed by the Cape and Islands United Way to these six Falmouth nonprofits. Thirty-six organizations and 42 programs across the region will receive a total of $600,000 to address critical community needs. A list of funded Community Impact Partners can be found at www.uwcapecod.org.

The Community Impact Council of the United Way is currently working on a revision of the Community Impact Agenda to guide priorities for the future. The next Request for Proposals will be released in the fall, with a Letter of Intent due in November. Falmouth nonprofits providing services in the areas of health, education, financial stability, and housing are encouraged to apply.

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