Kitten season is right around the corner, so this seems like a good time to list the special considerations when adopting a kitten.

1) You’re not just adopting a cute fluffy kitten; you’re making a commitment to provide a permanent home for a cat that may live to be 20 years old or more. If you’re renting, be sure that you have permission to have a cat and that everyone in your household is in favor of the adoption. If you’re older, you should make plans for someone who can look after your cat if you are no longer able to do so.

2). Kittens need extra veterinary care during the first few months of their lives and depending where you get your kitten, you may be responsible for many vet trips for vaccinations, worm and flea treatments and spay or neuter surgery. At People for Cats, all kittens are spayed or neutered and microchipped prior to adoption. They have a thorough examination and receive all age-appropriate immunizations and treatments. PFC kittens have spent the first few months of their lives in an experienced “foster home,” where they are socialized and litter-trained.

3) Just like puppies, kittens need training and socialization. Although your kitten may know how to use the litter box, it needs to be taught how to get along with its new family. Frequent gentle handling, especially of its paws, ears and face, will make grooming and vet visits easier. Use toys to play with the kitten rather than your hands or feet; otherwise you’re teaching it that biting and scratching people are acceptable. If your kitten does bite or scratch you, gently put it down and walk away. Eventually it will learn that the fun stops when the claws come out.

4) Kittens need companionship. Ideally kittens should be adopted in pairs. They will keep each other company and learn cat etiquette through playing together. If you have other cat-friendly pets in the house, they may provide the same service to a single kitten. A kitten that is left alone for long periods will be bored and will likely find some mischief to get into. It’s much pleasanter to come home to a pair of kittens exhausted from roughhousing with each other and ready for some quiet petting.

Adopting kittens can be fun and rewarding, but only if you’re willing to put the time and effort into helping them grow into loving and healthy cats.

Kiwi, our Cat of the Week—a 2-1⁄2-year-old brown tabby domestic shorthaired female—was among the amazing adoption of 10 kitties who found their fur-ever homes last Saturday. There were four kittens and six cats adopted on a very busy, but happy day for our adoption team and the new cat owners!

There are still a few kitties looking for their own “fur-ever” homes. Murphy is a very handsome 9-year-old black domestic shorthaired male. He has a gleaming black fur coat accented by pale yellow eyes and is one of the best “purrers” we’ve heard in a long time! He is a big lovable goofy boy who came to PFC with his housemate Gracie, who is a 9-year-old pretty shorthaired brown tabby with dark brown tiger stripes and spots. She is a sweet girl who takes a little longer than Murphy to become your best friend, but once she warms up, she is affectionate and merrily purrs away. Gracie and Murphy are a bonded pair that have lived together since they were kittens, so we are looking for a home that will adopt both of them.

Fiona is a 6-year-old tuxedo female, who has a short shiny black coat accented by white on her face, bib, chest, belly and paws. Fiona loves everyone she meets and greets them with gentle meows, head butts and purrs. She has an irritable tummy, which is kept in check with daily medication that she seems to enjoy taking! We are looking for a special person who is willing to offer this little princess a “fur-ever” home of her own.

Two newbies to PFC, but ready to be adopted, are Oreo and Mittens. They are adorable 6-year-old tuxedo domestic shorthaired females. Oreo has a gleaming black coat accented with tuxedo marking of white on her bib, tummy and muzzle and a cute pink nose. She is a sweet kitty who loves to cuddle and is quite vocal in letting you know she wants attention.

Mittens sports a shiny black coat highlighted by the classic tuxedo markings of white bib, tummy and paws, with a cute little swirl of white by her nose. She is reported to be quite the love bug, playful, and a total purr machine. We would like to adopt these two girls together since they appear to be a bonded pair.

We are expecting other cats to be coming into PFC and they will be available as soon as they have their vet visits and are cleared for adoption. Watch our Facebook page for information about kittens coming into the shelter ready for adoption.

The PFC shelter is at 44 Beagle Lane, Teaticket, MA. Our mailing address is PO Box 422, West Falmouth, MA 02574.

The shelter is open for adoptions and visitors Wednesday from 4 to 6 PM and Saturday from 10 AM to 1 PM. If you need to get in touch with us when we are closed, call our hotline at 508-540-5654. We have added a new option to our hotline mailbox to make surrendering a cat or kitten more efficient. Press #0 if you have cat-related issues, questions, are interested in volunteering or for additional information about People for Cats. Press #2 if you need financial assistance for veterinary care or spay/neuter assistance. Press #3 if you have a cat or kitten to surrender and be sure to leave your name, telephone number and a brief description of the cat. All calls are returned as quickly as possible.

Check us out at www.peopleforcats.org, look for our available cats on Petfinder and like us on our Facebook page.

All for the love of cats…

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