Astronomical summer may not begin until the summer solstice, which is June 21, but as far as the library is concerned, summer is here! Browse the popular beach basket, put in a piece of the summer jigsaw puzzle and see the maps where visitors are invited to place a pin in their hometown. That’s just inside the building. We like to be outside in the summer, too! Look for our new Book Bike around town. It will be on the library lawn every Monday at the corner of Main Street and Library Lane from 2:30 to 4:30 PM; at the farmers market on select Thursday afternoons at Marine Park on Scranton Avenue; at Storytimes on Surf Drive Beach, Thursdays in July from 4:45 to 5:15 PM; and at the annual Falmouth Public Library Night at the Commodores game (date to be determined). All appearances are weather permitting. Plan ahead for the Friends Book Sale on the library lawn from July 4 to 9. With more than 50,000 items, this is one of the largest book sales in New England. Bring bags (or a wagon, or wheeled shopping cart) because you’ll find lots of great deals. The last day for donating books to the sale is Saturday, June 15. Donations will be accepted again beginning Monday, July 22.

Monday, June 3

1–2 PM, Next Chapter Book Club. The Next Chapter Book Club [an international organization] is committed to providing weekly opportunities for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities to read, learn and make friends in a relaxed, community setting....Anyone can participate, whatever their reading or ability level. Space is limited to eight members. This group is currently full. If you would like to be added to the wait list, contact the reference department. Contact: reference department at 508-457-2555, extension 7, ior nfo@falmouthpubliclibrary.org. Location: The Brabson Teen (YA) Room.

2:30–4:30 PM, Falmouth Book Bike on the library lawn. On Mondays from 2:30 to 4:30, the Falmouth Book Bike will be parked on the library lawn at the corner of Main Street and Library Lane. Today is a free movie day. Stop by and pick up one or some. Book Bike Ambassadors are assistant director Jennifer Woodward and friends. Contact: library staff, 508-457-2555. Location: library lawn.

Tuesday, June 4

2-4 PM, Research Your Family History with the Falmouth Genealogical Society. Volunteers from the Falmouth Genealogical Society will be available to help get you started with researching your family history. Drop by anytime between 2 and 4 PM. Discover the great resources the library has to offer and learn from local genealogy experts during our weekly help sessions. Contact: reference department at 508-457-2555, extension 7, or info@falmouthpubliclibrary.org. Location: Lemcke Reference Room.

4-5 PM, Afterschool LEGOs Club. For builders of all ages. Please leave your LEGOs at home. Contact: youth services, 508-457-2555, extension 6. Location: Children’s Program Room.

5-7 PM, Chess Club. Players of all skill levels welcome Come and join us in the Reading Room. Contact: Linda Collins, library director, 508-457-2555, extension 2961. Location: Reading Room.

Wednesday, June 5

7–8 PM, Reinvigorate Your Community: Reconnect with Democracy. Meet Susan Clark, co-author of “Slow Democracy.” In “Slow Democracy,” community leader Susan Clark and democracy scholar Woden Teachout describe how citizens around the country are breathing new life into their communities. Large institutions, centralized governments, and top-down thinking are no longer society’s drivers. New decision-making techniques are ensuring that local communities—and the citizens who live there—are uniquely suited to meet today’s challenges. Contact: reference department, 508-457-2555, extension 7. Location: Hermann Foundation Meeting Room.

Thursday, June 6

9:45–10:30 AM, Lapbabies. Enjoy songs, finger-play, stories, and playtime in this class geared toward non-walkers (birth–15 months) and their caregivers. Sponsored by The Coalition for Children. Contact: The Coalition for Children, 508-548-0150, extension 172. Location: Children’s Program Room.

10–11 AM, Narrative Nonfiction Book Club. In this monthly meeting of the Narrative Nonfiction Book Club, we will be reading “H is for Hawk,” by Helen Macdonald. Pick up a copy at the reference desk and join us. New members are always welcome. Contact: reference department, 508-457-2555, extension 7. Location: Hermann Foundation Meeting Room.

Friday, June 7

10–10:45 AM, Tots ‘n Tales. Stories, music and movement for toddlers and their siblings. For 15 months-3 years. Drop in. Sponsored by The Coalition for Children. Contact: The Coalition for Children, 508-548-0151, extension 172. Location: Children’s Program Room.

11 AM–noon, Wiggle to the Music. Put on your dancing shoes and move to the music in this class promoting motor development for children ages 2 and older and their caregivers. Drop in. Sponsored by The Coalition for Children. Contact: The Coalition for Children, 508-548-0151, extension 172. Location: Children’s Program Room.

1–2:30 PM, Poetry Discussion Group. This month’s poetry discussion will feature the poems of Brendan Galvin. Please bring 10 copies of two poems by Brendan Galvin. Facilitated by Alice Kociemba, founding director, Calliope Poetry for Community. New members are always welcome. Contact: reference department, 508-457-2555, extension 7. Location: Trustees Room.

Questions Asked At The Reference Desk

Q. I heard there is something called a slave Bible. Can you tell me about it?

A. “The ‘Slave Bible,’ as it would become known, is a missionary book. It was originally published in London in 1807 on behalf of the Society for the Conversion of Negro Slaves, an organization dedicated to improving the lives of enslaved Africans toiling in Britain’s lucrative Caribbean colonies. They used the Slave Bible to teach enslaved Africans how to read while at the same time introducing them to the Christian faith. Unlike other missionary bibles, however, the Slave Bible contained only select parts of the biblical text. Its publishers deliberately removed portions of the biblical text, such as the exodus story, that could inspire hope for liberation. Instead, the publishers emphasized portions that justified and fortified the system of slavery that was so vital to the British Empire.” This quotation is from the website of the Museum of the Bible in Washington, DC (https://www.museumofthebible.org/exhibits/slave-bible), which is currently hosting an exhibition of this rare book. There are only three copies known to exist. The exhibition opened last November and runs through September 1, 2019.

For more information, go online to NPR.org to find the interview, titled “Slave Bible from The 1800s Omitted Key Passages That Could Incite Rebellion” with Anthony Schmidt, associate curator of the Museum of the Bible on “All Things Considered” on December 9, 2018.

If you have a reference question, e-mail the reference department at info@falmouthpubliclibrary.org, call 508-457-2555, extension 7, or stop by the reference desk. We are happy to help you.

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