Sylvia (Steigman) Brodsky of Falmouth died last Friday night, October 2, at Atria Woodbriar in Falmouth at the age of 103.

Born to immigrant parents from Austria, she lived most of her life in the Boston area.

She married Larry Brodsky in 1946 when he returned from his service in the Pacific theater of war. She did the bookkeeping for their restaurant businesses.

Sylvia’s love of art and talent for painting began to bloom under her teacher, Albert Alcalay, and led to a change of the family’s business. Harvard Square Art Center, a full-service art supply store and picture-framing shop, supported the family as well as Sylvia’s vocation, and she produced a strong body of work, winning prizes and mounting shows at the Cambridge Artists Guild and other locations.

The summer house in Falmouth led to Sylvia’s membership in the Falmouth Artist Guild where she showed her sense of color and composition in abstract oil paintings. Returning to Newton in September, she would rejoin the art and music scene in the city. Her love of jazz informed her work, producing a vibrant jazz series.

In 2016, Sylvia moved to Atria in Falmouth and enjoyed the cultural events as well as visits from family and friends. She kept her strong personality and sense of humor until the end.

She was predeceased by her husband and leaves her children, Jane Brodsky Fitzpatrick and her husband, Kevin; Joseph R. Brodsky and his wife, Ellen N., and Michael Brodsky and his wife Janet Hofmann; grandchildren, Samuel, David, Jacob, Ivan and Milo Brodsky; and three great-grandchildren.

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