pfc athena 051719

Athena

What makes a cat a tabby? To begin with, “tabby” is not a breed of cat, but rather a cat’s coat pattern. Basically, a tabby cat has fur with individual hair shafts having alternating bands of light and dark. All tabbies have an “M” marking on their forehead and a darker line down their back. Beyond that, they show a wide variety of colors and patterns. It’s believed that these markings acted as camouflage, allowing the wild ancestors of domestic cats to hide from both predators and prey.

There are four basic types of tabby cats. The most common is the mackerel striped tabby, also called a tiger cat, with vertical stripes down the sides. The classic tabby has swirls on its sides, rather like a marble cake. Bengals and ocicats are examples of spotted tabbies, with spots instead of lines on their bodies. A ticked or agouti tabby doesn’t have either stripes or spots, but possesses the typical facial markings. Abyssinians and Singapuras are ticked tabbies. Tabby patterns are found in many cat breeds, ranging from domestic shorthairs to Orientals to long-haired Maine Coons weighing in at more than 20 pounds.

Each of these patterns may come in a number of colors, including brown, gray and orange, plus their paler shades (dilute). Interestingly, more than three-quarters of orange tabbies are male because the gene is sex-linked. Like humans, male cats are XY and females XX. A male cat who inherits one copy of the orange gene on the X chromosome will be orange, but an orange female must have a copy on both of her X chromosomes. All orange cats are tabbies, although the pattern may be indistinct. Tortoiseshell cats, females with both orange and black markings, may also show tabby patterns and are referred to as “torbies.”

Our cat of the week, Athena, is a pretty little brown tabby. This 9-years-young lady’s tabby coat is accented with muted darker stripes. She also has a bit of white fur around her muzzle and big expressive green eyes. Athena is an absolute sweetheart who adores attention. She will make a lucky someone a wonderful companion cat. Athena was brought to PFC after her previous owner passed away and cats belonging to the people who took her in would not accept her. This friendly little girl might do best as an only cat or a companion to an equally laid-back cat. Why not come in to meet her and see if she’s the “purr-fect” kitty for you?

Last week’s cat of the week, Mittens, found his “fur-ever” home quickly, as did our little Siamese girl Misty and two of our bonded pairs. The first pair to go home was 8½-year-old housemates Gracie and Murphy and several days later 1½-year-old sisters Daisy and Destiny pranced off to their “fur-ever” home. We have since gotten in a few more bonded pairs that are waiting for their vet visits and should be available for adoption shortly.

We have a few single cats available. Fiona is a cute little 6-year-old tuxedo girl who has tummy issues and requires daily medicine to help control them. Raven is a pretty 1½-year-old black girl with a bit of a spicy attitude, so if you are looking for a bit of a challenge come in and meet her. Lilly is an adorable 10-year-young brown tabby lady who is hyperthyroid, a very common disorder among cats, and requires getting chewable medication 2 times a day. Lilly is available for either adoption or a long-term foster situation, where you supply the home and loving care while PFC covers the vet bills and medication. There are a few new single cats waiting for their vet visits before they will be available.

Our census does change frequently and we urge you to check with us often if you are looking for a new family member in the form of a feline companion or two. You never know if your ideal BFF kitty is at the shelter waiting to make your acquaintance.

PFC is accepting donations for our annual flea market being held on July 20. If you have items to donate. please call Anne at 508-457-1093.

We are also looking for a volunteer with a truck to help out once a month to pick up 1 to 2 pallets of cat litter for the shelter. If you are able to help, please respond to shelter_beagleln@aol.com. Thank you.

The PFC shelter is at 44 Beagle Lane, Teaticket, MA. Our mailing address is PO Box 422, West Falmouth, MA 02574.

The shelter is open for adoptions and visitors Wednesday from 4-6 PM and Saturday from 10 AM to 1 PM. If you need to get in touch with us when we are closed, call our hotline at 508-540-5654. We have added a new option to our hotline mailbox to make surrendering a cat or kitten more efficient. Press #0 if you have cat related issues, questions, are interested in volunteering or for additional information about People for Cats. Press #2 if you need financial assistance for veterinary care or spay/neuter assistance. Press #3 if you have a cat or kitten to surrender and be sure to leave your name, telephone number and a brief description of the cat. All calls are returned as quickly as possible.

Check us out on our website at www.peopleforcats.org, look for our available cats on Petfinder and like us on our Facebook page.

All for the love of cats…

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